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Question:

SHARP ESSAY

by | Jun 5, 2022 | fresh

Inform learners they  will write a two-page (maximum) essay addressing actual SHARP issues  from your environment – unit, organization, or Army – and making  recommendations on how all leaders at all levels can implement potential  solutions. The winner will be selected by the commandant and recognized  with a certificate of achievement and coin during graduation.  
Title: “Why does the number of sexual assaults continue to increase throughout your unit/organization/Army?” (Choose one)

I. Introduction (1-2 paragraphs)

A. Opening statement 
B. Background information 
C. Purpose statement 
II. Body (2-4 paragraphs) 
A. (Point A) Why does sexual assault occur? Include supporting evidence. 
B.  (Point B) Does our current approach to training reduce (or not reduce)  the risk of sexual assault and harassment? (Could be tied to point A) 
C. (Point C) Supporting topic & evidence to support your thesis. 
D. (Point D) How do we end sexual violence in the military? 
III. Conclusion (1-2 paragraphs) 
A. Summarize the main points. 
B. Make a strong, memorable final statement. 
NOTES: 
• Essay must be 1-2 pages in length (title page does not count as a page). 
• Essay is an individual activity (although peer editing is allowed). 
• Essay must contain two references (ARs, personal interviews, peer review articles, etc.).

Department of Defense

INSTRUCTION

NUMBER 6495.02
March 28, 2013

Incorporating Change 3, May 24, 2017

USD(P&R)

SUBJECT: Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program Procedures

References: See Enclosure 1

1. PURPOSE. This Instruction reissues DoD Instruction (DoDI) 6495.02 (Reference (a)), in

accordance with the authority in DoD Directives (DoDD) 5124.02 and 6495.01 (References (b)

and (c)):

a. Establishes policy and implements Reference (c) and assigns responsibilities and provides

guidance and procedures for the SAPR Program (see Glossary in Reference (c)).

b. Establishes the processes and procedures for the Sexual Assault Forensic Examination

(SAFE) Kit.

c. Establishes the multidisciplinary Case Management Group (CMG) (see Glossary) and

provides guidance on how to handle sexual assault.

d. Establishes SAPR minimum program standards, SAPR training requirements, and SAPR

requirements for the DoD Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military consistent with Title

10, United States Code (Reference (d)) the DoD Task Force Report on Care for Victims of

Sexual Assault (Reference (e)) and pursuant to References (b) and (c), and Public Laws 106-65,

108-375, 109-163, 109-364, 110-417, 111-84, 111-383, 112-81, 112-239, 113-66, and 113-291

(References (f) through (p)).

e. Implements section 536 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal

Year (FY) 2016 (Reference (q)) that preempts State laws that require disclosure of personally

identifiable information (PII) of the adult sexual assault victim or alleged perpetrator to local or

State law enforcement.

f. Incorporates and cancels Directive-Type Memorandum (DTM) 11-063 (Reference (r)) and

DTM 11-062 (Reference (s)) DTM 14-007(Reference (t)).

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 2

2. APPLICABILITY

a. This Instruction applies to:

(1) OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of

Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Inspector General of the Department of

Defense (IG DoD), the Defense Agencies, the DoD Field Activities, and all other organizational

entities within the DoD (hereinafter referred to collectively as the “DoD Components”).

(2) National Guard (NG) and Reserve members who are sexually assaulted when

performing active service, as defined in section 101(d)(3) of Reference (d), and inactive duty

training. If reporting a sexual assault that occurred prior to or while not performing active

service or inactive training, NG and Reserve members will be eligible to receive timely access to

SAPR advocacy services from a SARC and a SAPR VA, and the appropriate non-medical

referrals, if requested, in accordance with section 584(a) of the NDAA for FY 2012 (Reference

(m)), as amended by Section 1724 of the NDAA for FY 2014 (Reference (o)). They also have

access to a Special Victims’ Counsel or Victims’ Legal Counsel (SVC/VLC) in accordance with

section 1044e of Reference (d) and are eligible to file a Restricted or Unrestricted Report.

Reports of prior- to- military service sexual assault shall be handled in accordance with the

procedures for Restricted and Unrestricted Reports outlined in this Instruction, as appropriate

based on the type of report made (Restricted or Unrestricted). Reserve Component members can

report at any time, and do not have to wait to be performing active service or be in inactive

training to file their report.

(3) Military dependents 18 years of age and older who are eligible for treatment in the

military healthcare system (MHS), at installations in the continental United States (CONUS) and

outside of the continental United States (OCONUS), and who were victims of sexual assault

perpetrated by someone other than a spouse or intimate partner (See Glossary). Adult military

dependents may file unrestricted or restricted reports of sexual assault.

(4) The following non-military individuals who are victims of sexual assault are only

eligible for limited emergency care medical services at a military treatment facility (MTF),

unless that individual is otherwise eligible as a Service member or TRICARE

(http://www.tricare.mil) beneficiary of the military health system to receive treatment in a MTF

at no cost to them. At this time, they are only eligible to file an Unrestricted Report. They will

also be offered the LIMITED SAPR services to be defined as the assistance of a Sexual Assault

Response Coordinator (SARC) and a SAPR Victim Advocate (VA) while undergoing emergency

care OCONUS. These limited medical and SAPR services shall be provided to:

(a) DoD civilian employees and their family dependents 18 years of age and older

when they are stationed or performing duties OCONUS and eligible for treatment in the MHS at

military installations or facilities OCONUS. These DoD civilian employees and their family

dependents 18 years of age and older only have the Unrestricted Reporting option.

(b) U.S. citizen DoD contractor personnel when they are authorized to accompany

the Armed Forces in a contingency operation OCONUS and their U.S. citizen employees. DoD

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 3

contractor personnel only have the Unrestricted Reporting option. Additional medical services

may be provided to contractors covered under this instruction in accordance with DoDI 3020.41

(Reference (u)) as applicable.

(5) Service members who were victims of sexual assault PRIOR to enlistment or

commissioning are eligible to receive SAPR services (see Glossary) under either reporting

option. The DoD shall provide support to Service members regardless of when or where the

sexual assault took place. The SARC or SAPR VA will assist a victim to complete a DD Form

2910, “Victim Reporting Preference Statement,” and provide advocacy services and the

appropriate referrals, if requested, for victimization occurring prior to military service.

(a) Prior- to- military service victimization includes adult sexual assault (including

stranger sexual assault and intimate partner sexual assault, if the victim is no longer in the same

intimate relationship) and sexual assault that was perpetrated on the Service member while he or

she was still a child.

(b) Reports of prior-to-military service sexual assault will be handled in accordance

with the procedures for Restricted and Unrestricted Reports outlined in this instruction, as

appropriate based on the type of report made (Restricted or Unrestricted).

b. This instruction does NOT apply to victims of sexual assault perpetrated by a spouse or

intimate partner (see Glossary), or military dependents under the age of 18 who are sexually

assaulted. The Family Advocacy Program (FAP), as described in Volume 2 of DoD Manual

6400.1 (Reference (v)), provides the full range of services to those individuals. When a sexual

assault occurs as a result of domestic abuse or involves child abuse, the installation SARC and

the installation FAP staff will direct the victim to FAP.

3. DEFINITIONS. See Glossary.

4. POLICY. It is DoD policy, in accordance with Reference (c), that:

a. This Instruction and Reference (c) establish and implement the DoD SAPR program.

Unrestricted and Restricted Reporting options are available to Service members and their adult

military dependents in accordance with this Instruction.

b. The DoD goal is a culture free of sexual assault, through an environment of prevention,

education and training, response capability (see Glossary), victim support, reporting procedures,

and appropriate accountability that enhances the safety and well-being of all persons covered by

this Instruction and Reference (c).

(1) While a sexual assault victim may disclose information to whomever he or she

chooses, an official report is made only when a DD Form 2910 is signed and filed with a SARC

or SAPR VA, or when a Military Criminal Investigative Organization (MCIO) investigator

initiates an investigation.

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 4

(2) For Restricted and Unrestricted Reporting purposes, a report can be made to

healthcare personnel, but healthcare personnel then immediately contact the SARC or SAPR VA

to fill out the DD Form 2910. Chaplains and military attorneys cannot take official reports.

(3) State laws that require disclosure of PII of the adult sexual assault victim or alleged

perpetrator to local or State law enforcement are preempted by Reference (q).

(4) Unless a DD Form 2910 is filed with a SARC, a report to a Chaplain or military

attorney may not result in the rendering of SAPR services or investigative action because of the

privileges associated with speaking to these individuals. A Chaplain or military attorney should

advise the victim to consult with a SARC to understand the full scope of services available or

facilitate, with the victim’s consent, contact with a SARC.

c. The SAPR Program shall:

(1) Focus on the victim and on doing what is necessary and appropriate to support victim

recovery, and also, if a Service member, to support that Service member to be fully mission

capable and engaged.

(2) Require that medical care and SAPR services are gender-responsive, culturally

competent, and recovery-oriented as defined in the Glossary of Reference (c).

(3) Not provide policy for legal processes within the responsibility of the Judge

Advocates General (JAG) of the Military Departments provided in sections 801-946 of

Reference (d), also known and referred to in this instruction as the Uniform Code of Military

Justice (UCMJ); the Manual for Courts-Martial (Reference (u)); or for criminal investigative

matters assigned to the IG DoD.

d. Command sexual assault awareness and prevention programs and DoD law enforcement

(see Glossary) and criminal justice procedures that enable persons to be held appropriately

accountable for their actions shall be supported by all commanders.

e. Standardized SAPR requirements, terminology, guidelines, protocols, and guidelines for

training materials shall focus on awareness, prevention, and response at all levels, as appropriate.

f. SARC and SAPR VA shall be used as standard terms as defined in and in accordance with

Reference (c) throughout the Military Departments to facilitate communications and

transparency regarding SAPR response capability.

g. The SARCs shall serve as the single point of contact for coordinating care to ensure that

sexual assault victims receive appropriate and responsive care. All SARCs shall be authorized to

perform victim advocate duties in accordance with service regulations and will be acting in the

performance of those duties.

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 5

h. All SARCs shall have direct and unimpeded contact and access to the installation

commander (see Glossary) and the immediate commander of the Service member victim and

alleged Service member offender for the purpose of this Instruction and Reference (c). The

installation commander will have direct contact with the SARC(s) and this responsibility is not

further delegable.

(1) If an installation has multiple SARCs on the installation, a Lead SARC shall be

designated by the Service.

(2) For SARCs that operate within deployable commands that are not attached to an

installation, they shall have access to the senior commander for the deployable command.

i. A 24 hours, 7 days per week sexual assault response capability for all locations, including

deployed areas, shall be established for persons covered in this Instruction. An immediate,

trained sexual assault response capability shall be available for each report of sexual assault in all

locations, including in deployed locations.

j. SARCs, SAPR VAs, and other responders (see Glossary) will assist sexual assault victims

regardless of Service affiliation.

k. Service member and adult military dependent victims of sexual assault shall receive

timely access to comprehensive medical and psychological treatment, including emergency care

treatment and services, as described in this Instruction and Reference (c).

l. Sexual assault victims shall be given priority, and treated as emergency cases. Emergency

care (see Glossary) shall consist of emergency medical care and the offer of a SAFE. The victim

shall be advised that even if a SAFE is declined the victim shall be encouraged (but not

mandated) to receive medical care, psychological care, and victim advocacy.

m. DoD prohibits granting a waiver for commissioning or enlistment in the Military Services

when the person has a qualifying conviction (see Glossary) for a crime of sexual assault or is

required to be registered as a sex offender.

n. There will be a safety assessment capability for the purposes of ensuring the victim, and

possibly other persons, are not in physical jeopardy. A safety assessment will be available to all

Service members, adult military dependents, and civilians who are eligible for SAPR services,

even if the victim is not physically located on the installation. The installation commander or the

deputy installation commander will identify installation personnel who have been trained and are

able to perform a safety assessment of each sexual assault victim, regardless of whether he or she

filed a Restricted or Unrestricted Report. Individuals tasked to conduct safety assessments must

occupy positions that do not compromise the victim’s reporting options. The safety assessment

will be conducted as soon as possible, understanding that any delay may impact the safety of the

victim.

(1) For Unrestricted Reports, if a victim is assessed to be in a high-risk situation, the

assessor will immediately contact the installation commander or his or her deputy, who will

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 6

immediately stand up a multi-disciplinary High-Risk Response Team in accordance with the

guidance in Enclosure 9 of this Instruction. This will be done even if the victim is not physically

located on the installation.

(2) For Restricted Reports, if the victim is assessed to be in a high-risk situation, it may

qualify as an exception to Restricted Reporting, which is necessary to prevent or mitigate a

serious and imminent threat to the health or safety of the victim or another person. The SARC

will be immediately notified. The SARC will disclose the otherwise-protected confidential

information only after consultation with the staff judge advocate (SJA) of the installation

commander, supporting judge advocate, or other legal advisor concerned, who will advise the

SARC as to whether an exception to Restricted Reporting applies, in accordance with the

guidance in Enclosure 4 of this Instruction. If the SJA determines that the victim is not in a high-

risk situation, then the report will remain Restricted. The SARC will ensure a safety assessment

is conducted.

o. Service members who file an Unrestricted Report of sexual assault shall be informed by

the SARC or SAPR VA at the time of making the report, or as soon as practicable, of the option

to request an Expedited Transfer, in accordance with the procedures for commanders in

Enclosure 5 of this Instruction. A Service member may request:

(1) A temporary or permanent Expedited Transfer from their assigned command or

installation to a different command or installation; or

(2) A temporary or permanent Expedited Transfer to a different location within their

assigned command or installation.

p. An enlisted Service member or a commissioned officer who made an Unrestricted Report

of sexual assault and is recommended for involuntary separation from the Military Services

within 1 year of final disposition of his or her sexual assault case may request a general or flag

officer (G/FO) review of the circumstances of and grounds for the involuntary separation in

accordance with DoD Instructions 1332.14 and 1332.30 (References (x) and (y)).

(1) A Service member requesting this review must submit his or her written request to

the first G/FO in the separation authority’s chain of command before the separation authority

approves the member’s final separation action.

(2) Requests submitted after final separation action is complete will not be reviewed by a

G/FO, but the separated Service member may apply to the appropriate Service Discharge Review

Board or Board of Correction of Military/Naval Records of their respective Service for

consideration.

(3) A Service member who submits a timely request will not be separated until the G/FO

conducting the review concurs with the circumstances of and the grounds for the involuntary

separation.

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 7

q. DoD prohibits granting a waiver for commissioning or enlistment in the Military Services

when the person has a qualifying conviction (see Glossary) for a crime of sexual assault, or a

conviction for an attempt of a sexual assault crime, or has ever been required to be registered as a

sex offender, in accordance with section 657 of Reference (d).

r. A Service member whose conviction of rape, sexual assault, forcible sodomy, or an

attempt to commit one of the offenses is final, and who is not punitively discharged in

connection with such convictions, will be processed for administrative separation for misconduct

in accordance with DoD Instruction 1332.14 and DoD Instruction 1332.30 (References (xv)

enlisted personnel and (y) commissioned officers).

s. Information regarding Restricted Reports should only be released to persons authorized

to accept Restricted Reports or as authorized by law or DoD regulation. Improper disclosure of

confidential communications under Restricted Reporting or improper release of medical

information are prohibited and may result in disciplinary action pursuant to the UCMJ or other

adverse personnel or administrative actions.

t. Information regarding Unrestricted Reports should only be released to personnel with an

official need to know or as authorized by law. Improper disclosure of confidential

communications under Unrestricted Reporting or improper release of medical information are

prohibited and may result in disciplinary action pursuant to the UCMJ or other adverse personnel

or administrative actions.

u. The DoD will retain the DD Forms 2910, “Victim Reporting Preference Statement,” and

2911, “DoD Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) Report,” for 50 years, regardless of

whether the Service member filed a Restricted or Unrestricted Report as defined in Reference

(c). Personally identifiable information (PII) will be protected in accordance with sections 552a

of title 5, United States Code, also known as the Privacy Act of 1974 (Reference (z)) and DoDD

5400.11 and Public Law 104-191 (References (aa) and (ab)).

(1) Document Retention and SAFE Kit Retention for Unrestricted Reports:

(a) The SARC will enter the Unrestricted Report DD Form 2910in the Defense

Sexual Assault Incident Database (DSAID) (see Glossary in Reference (c)) as an electronic

record within 48 hours of the report, where it will be retained for 50 years from the date the

victim signed the DD Form 2910. The DD Form 2910 is located at the DoD Forms Management

Program website at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/forms/index.htm.

(b) The DD Form 2911 shall be retained in accordance with DoDI 5505.18

(Reference (ac)). The DD Form 2911 is located at the DoD Forms Management Program

website at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives//forms/index.htm.

(c) If the victim had a SAFE, the SAFE Kit will be retained for 5 years in accordance

with Reference (ac) and in accordance with section 586 of Reference (m), as amended by section

538 of Reference (p). When the forensic examination is conducted at a civilian facility through a

memorandum of understanding (MOU) or a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the DoD,

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 8

the requirement for the handling of the forensic kit will be explicitly addressed in the MOU or

MOA. The MOU or MOA with the civilian facility will address the processes for contacting the

SARC and for contacting the appropriate DoD agency responsible for accepting custody of the

SAFE.

(d) Personal property retained as evidence collected in association with a sexual

assault investigation will be retained for a period of 5 years. Personal property may be returned

to the rightful owner of such property after the conclusion of all legal, adverse action and

administrative proceedings related to such incidents in accordance with section 586 of the

NDAA for FY 2012, as amended by section 538 of Reference (p) and DoD regulations.

(2) Document Retention and SAFE Kit Retention for Restricted Reports:

(a) The SARC will retain a copy of the Restricted Report DD Form 2910 for 50

years, consistent with DoD guidance for the storage of PII. The 50-year time frame for the DD

Form 2910 will start from the date the victim signs the DD Form 2910. For Restricted Reports,

forms will be retained in a manner that protects confidentiality.

(b) If the victim had a SAFE, the Restricted Report DD Form 2911 will be retained

for 50 years, consistent with DoD guidance for the storage of PII. The 50-year time frame for

the DD Form 2911 will start from the date the victim signs the DD Form 2910, but if there is no

DD Form 2910, the timeframe will start from the date the SAFE Kit is completed. Restricted

Report forms will be retained in a manner that protects confidentiality.

(c) If the victim had a SAFE, the SAFE Kit will be retained for 5 years in a location

designated by the Military Service concerned. When the forensic examination is conducted at a

civilian facility through an MOU or an MOA with the DoD, the requirement for the handling of

the forensic kit will be explicitly addressed in the MOU or MOA. The MOU or MOA with the

civilian facility will address the processes for contacting the SARC and for contacting the

appropriate DoD agency responsible for accepting custody of the forensic kit. The 5-year time

frame will start from the date the victim signs the DD Form 2910, but if there is no DD Form

2910, the timeframe will start from the date the SAFE Kit is completed.

(d) Personal property retained as evidence collected in association with a sexual

assault investigation will be retained for a period of 5 years. In the event the report is converted

to Unrestricted or an independent investigation is conducted, personal property may be returned

to the rightful owner of such property after the conclusion of all legal, adverse action and

administrative proceedings related to such incidents in accordance with section 586 of Reference

(m), as amended by section 538 of Reference (p), and DoD regulations.

v. Current or former Service members who made a report of sexual assault may contact their

respective Service SAPR headquarters office or Service or NG SARCs for help accessing their

DD Forms 2910 and 2911. Requests for release of information relating to sexual assaults will be

processed by the organization concerned, in accordance with the procedures specified in the

sections 552 and 552a of Reference (z), also known as “The Freedom of Information Act” and

“The Privacy Act of 1974” respectively.

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 9

w. Service members who file Unrestricted and Restricted Reports of sexual assault and/or

their dependents shall be protected from retaliation, reprisal, ostracism, maltreatment, or threats

thereof, for filing a report.

x. An incident report must be submitted in writing within 8 days after an Unrestricted Report

of sexual assault has been made in accordance with section 1743 of Reference (o). This 8-day

incident report will only be provided to personnel with an official need to know.

y. At the time of reporting, victims must be informed of the availability of legal assistance

and the right to consult with a SVC/VLC in accordance with section 1044e of Reference (d).

z. Consistent with the Presidential Memorandum (Reference (ad)), sexual assaults in DoD

confinement facilities involving Service members will be governed by Part 115 of Title 28, Code

of Federal Regulations (Reference (ae)).

5. RESPONSIBILITIES. See Enclosure 2.

6. PROCEDURES. See Enclosures 3 through 12.

7. INFORMATION COLLECTIONS.

a. The DSAID, the DD Form 2910, and the DD Form 2965, “Defense Sexual Assault

Incident Database (DSAID) Data Form,” referred to in this Instruction, have been assigned

Office of Management and Budget control number 0704-0482 in accordance with the procedures

in Volume 2 of DoD Manual 8910.01 (Reference (af)).

b. The annual report regarding sexual assaults involving Service members and improvement

to sexual assault prevention and response programs referred to in paragraph 6.z. of Enclosure 2;

paragraphs 1.i., 1.j., and 1.l. of Enclosure 3; paragraph 3.h.(2) and 6.i. of Enclosure 5; and

sections 1 and 4 of Enclosure 12 of this Instruction is submitted to Congress in accordance with

section 1631(d) of Reference (l) and is coordinated with the Assistant Secretary of Defense for

Legislative Affairs in accordance with the procedures in DoDI 5545.02 (Reference (ag)).

c. The quarterly reports of sexual assaults involving Service members referred to in

Enclosures 2, 3, 10, 11, and 12 of this Instruction are prescribed by Reference (b) and have been

assigned report control symbol DD-P&R(Q)2205 in accordance with the procedures in

Reference (af) and Volume 1 of DoD Manual 8910.01 (Reference (ah)).

d. The Service Academy sexual assault survey referred to in section 3 of Enclosure 12 of this

Instruction has been assigned report control symbol DD-P&R(A)2198 in accordance with the

procedures in References (af) and (ah).

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 10

e. The Survivor Experience Survey, referred to in section 1 of Enclosure 12 of this

Instruction and conducted by the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC), has been assigned

the Report Control Symbol DD-P&R(AR)2554 in accordance with the procedures in

Reference (af).

8. RELEASABILITY. Cleared for public release. This Instruction is available on the DoD

Issuances Website at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives.

9. SUMMARY OF CHANGE 3. The changes to this issuance are administrative and update

organizational titles and references for accuracy.

10. EFFECTIVE DATE. This Instruction is effective March 28, 2013.

Enclosures

1. References

2. Responsibilities

3. Oversight of the SAPR Program

4. Reporting Options and Sexual Assault Reporting Procedures

5. Commander and Management SAPR Procedures

6. SARC and SAPR VA Procedures

7. Healthcare Provider Procedures

8. SAFE Kit Collection and Preservation

9. Case Management for Unrestricted Reports of Sexual Assault

10. Training Requirements for DoD Personnel

11. DSAID

12. Sexual Assault Annual and Quarterly Reporting Requirements

Glossary

DoDI 6495.02, March 28, 2013

Change 3, 05/24/2017 CONTENTS

11

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ENCLOSURE 1: REFERENCES …………………………………………………………………………………….14

ENCLOSURE 2: RESPONSIBILITIES ……………………………………………………………………………17

UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR PERSONNEL AND READINESS

(USD(P&R)) ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….17

DIRECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCE ACTIVITY

(DoDHRA) ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….17

ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR HEALTH AFFAIRS (ASD(HA)) …………18

GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (GC DoD) ………………….19

IG DoD…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….19

SECRETARIES OF THE MILITARY DEPARTMENTS………………………………………………19

CHIEF, NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU (NGB)………………………………………………………….29

CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF ………………………………………………………30

COMMANDERS OF THE COMBATANT COMMANDS ……………………………………………30

ENCLOSURE 3: OVERSIGHT OF THE SAPR PROGRAM……………………………………………..31

DIRECTOR, SAPRO …………………………………………………………………………………………………31

SAPR …

UNCLASSIFIED

Army Regulation 600 – 20

Personnel-General

Army
Command
Policy

Headquarters
Department of the Army
Washington, DC
24 July 2020

SUMMARY of CHANGE
AR 600 – 20
Army Command Policy

This major revision, dated 24 July 2020—

o Adds reference to DoDI 1342.22 which now serves as the primary source of Family readiness policy guidance
(title page).

o Adds and/or updates responsibilities for the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations, Environment and
Energy); Deputy Chief of Staff, G–9; Commanding General, U.S. Army Materiel Command; and the
Commanding General, U.S. Army Installation Management Command (paras 1–4b, 1–4f, 2–5b, 5–2b, 7–5d).

o Requires command leadership to treat Soldiers and Department of the Army Civilians with dignity and respect at
all times (para 1–6c).

o Clarifies the written abbreviation for the grade of “Specialist” (table 1 – 1, note 5).

o Updates roles and responsibilities for command of installations (para 2–5b).

o Clarifies policy on assumptions of command during the temporary absence of the commander (paras 2–9a(3), 2–
9d, 2 – 10, and 2 – 12).

o Adds policy for command of installations, activities, and units on Joint bases (para 2 – 6).

o Clarifies policy on the role of the reviewing commander regarding designation of junior in the same grade to
command (para 2–8c).

o Adds and/or updates the Army’s Ready and Resilient efforts in the following manner: Defines Ready and Resilient
Strategic Objectives; modifies the Ready and Resilient Governance Structure; and realigns responsibilities (chap
3).

o Clarifies military authority for corrective training (para 4 – 6).

o Adds policy that commanders will notify the provost marshal office (Director of Emergency Services) or provost
marshal of military protective orders involving Soldiers (para 4–7e).

o Adds policy regarding commander’s actions toward deserters (para 4–7f).

o Adds policy on extremist organizations, cyber activity, and social media (para 4–12h).

o Clarifies that fraternization policy does not apply to married persons (para 4–14c(2)(a)).

o Incorporates DoDI 1304.33 and Army Directive 2016 – 17, Protecting Against Prohibited Relations During
Recruiting and Entry-Level Training, which prohibits relationships between recruiters and recruits, and trainers
and trainees (para 4 – 15).

o Adds online misconduct to harassment (hazing, bullying, or discriminatory harassment) (para 4 – 19).

o Clarifies the reporting, investigation, and data recording of harassment cases pursuant to DoDI 1020.03,
Harassment and Prevention and Response in the Armed Forces (paras 4–19c).

o Clarifies The Army Harassment Prevention and Response Program (hazing, bullying, and discriminatory
harassment) and incorporates Army Directive 2018 – 23, Improving the Effectiveness of Essential and Important
Army Programs: Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention, Equal Opportunity, Suicide Prevention,
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention, and Resilience (paras 4 – 19, 6 – 10, chap 7).

o Adds policy that Army individuals report harassment (hazing, bullying, and discriminatory harassment) to their
commander/supervisor, the Military Equal Opportunity, or law enforcement (para 4 – 19f).

o Adds policy that commanders notify Soldiers of requirements in the Domestic Violence Amendment to the Gun
Control Act of 1968 (para 4–22c(2)).

o Adds policy for command responsibility under the law of war (para 4 – 24).

o Adds policy for personnel recovery and code of conduct training (para 4 – 25).

o Adds policy for combating trafficking in persons (para 4 – 26).

o Adds Department of the Army Civilian Expeditionary Workforce to the list of those who may need a Family care
plan (para 5 – 3).

o Adds policy on the assistance role of Family readiness services in developing Family care plans (para 5–3r).

o Adds policy for command aspects of medical readiness and medical care (para 5 – 4).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2015 – 43, Revised Breastfeeding and Lactation Support policy (para 5 – 5).

o Incorporates Army Directives 2016 – 34, Processing Religious Accommodation Requests Requiring a Waiver to
Army Uniform or Grooming Policy and Army Directive 2018 – 19, Approval, Disapproval, and Elevation of
Requests for Religious Accommodation (para 5 – 6).

o Adds policy on Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers (para 5 – 8).

o Adds policy on the Soldier for Life Transition Assistance Program (SFL – TAP) for Soldiers and Department of
the Army Civilians (para 5 – 9).

o Updates policy on complaints or accusations against military personnel, in accordance with AR 20 – 1 (para 5 – 12).

o Updates policy on the Military Whistleblower Protection Act, in accordance with 10 USC 1034 and DoDD
7050.06 (para 5 – 12).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2014 – 20, Prohibition of Retaliation Against Soldiers for Reporting a Criminal
Offense (para 5 – 13).

o Clarifies policy on political activities as contained in DoDD 1344.10 (para 5 – 15 and app B).

o Adds policy on the Insider Threat Program (para 5 – 18).

o Adds policy on risk management (5 – 19).

o Adds policy for operations security (para 5 – 20).

o Adds policy for the Adoption Reimbursement Program (para 5 – 21).

o Updates Army Military Equal Opportunity Policy (chap 6).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2018 – 07 – 9, Prioritizing Efforts-Readiness and Lethality (Update 9) (chap 6).

o Removes sexual harassment from the Military Equal Opportunity Program (formerly discussed in chap 6).

o Updates policy on the Military Equal Opportunity and Harassment (hazing, bullying, or discriminatory
harassment) Complaint Processing System (para 6 – 6).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2019 – 20, Implement Army Heritage Month in the Military Equal Opportunity
Program (para 6 – 10j(5)).

o Adds policy on the Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program (chap 7).

o Incorporates DoDI 5505.18, Investigation of Adult Sexual Assault in the Department of Defense, and DoDI
6495.02, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program Procedures, (para 7 – 2).

o Adds Sexual Assault Incident Response Oversight Report requirements and incorporates DoDD 6495.01, Sexual
Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program, and DoDI 6495.02, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response
(SAPR) Program Procedures (para 7 – 2).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2013 – 20, Assessing Officers and Noncommissioned Officers on Fostering Climates
of Dignity and Respect and on Adhering to the Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program
(para 7–5o(33)).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2018 – 16, Suitability Criteria for Military Personnel in Specified Positions (paras 7–
5n(1) and 7–5o(29)).

o Prescribes DA Form 7746 (Sexual Harassment Complaint) and DA Form 7746–1 (Sexual Harassment Complaint
Resolution Assessment) (paras 7 –5y(3) and 7–8n(6)).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2015 – 16, Command Engagement to Prevent Retaliation (para 7 – 8 and app H).

o Adds policy on military equal opportunity professional staffing (app C).

o Adds policy on military equal opportunity, training, and education (app D.)

o Incorporates Army Directive 2013 – 29, Army Command Climate Assessments (app E).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2018 – 07 – 6, Prioritizing Efforts—Readiness and Lethality (Update 6) (app E).

o Updates policy on the Sexual Assault Review Board for unrestricted reports of sexual assault (app F).

o Adds Department of Defense Sexual Assault Advocate Certification Program requirements (app G).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2011 – 19, Expedite Transfer or Reassignment Procedures for Victims of Sexual
Assault (para 7 – 5 and app I).

o Adds commander’s critical information requirement(s) (app J).

o Updates confidentiality guidelines for restricted/unrestricted reporting (app L).

o Adds inspector general activities in support of the commander (app O).

o Incorporates DA Pam 600 – 26 (hereby superseded) (app Q).

o Adds an internal control evaluation (app R).

o Identifies a functional proponent for all command policies for which the Directorate of Military Personnel Policy,
Deputy Chief of Staff, G – 1 (DAPE – MPC) is not the primary subject matter expert (throughout).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2013 – 17, Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program in Initial
Military Training (throughout).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2016 – 35, Army Policy on Military Service of Transgender Soldiers (throughout).

o Incorporates Army Directive 2015 – 39, Inclusion of Sexual Orientation in the Military Equal Opportunity
Program (throughout).

*This regulation supersedes AR 600-20, dated 6 November 2014; DA Pam 600-26, dated 23 May 1990. The following Army Directives rescind upon
publication of this regulation; AD 2011-19, dated 3 October 2011; AD 2013-17, dated 22 July 2013; AD 2013-20, dated 27 September 2013; AD 2013-
29, dated 23 December 2013; AD 2014-20, dated 19 June 2014; AD 2015-16, dated 4 March 2015; AD 2015-39, dated 14 October 2015; AD 2015-43,
dated 10 November 2015; AD 2016-17, dated 22 June 2016; AD 2016-34, dated 6 October 2016; AD 2018-19, dated 8 November 2018; and AD 2019-
20, dated 16 May 2019.

AR 600–20 • 24 July 2020

UNCLASSIFIED
i

Headquarters
Department of the Army
Washington, DC

*Army Regulation 600 – 20

24 July 2020 Effective 24 July 2020
Personnel-General

Army Command Policy

History. This publication is a major re-
vision.

Summary. This regulation implements
DoDI 1020.03, DoDI 1300.17, DoDI
1325.02, DoDI 1325.06; DoDI 1342.22;
DoDI 5240.22, DoDI 5240.26, DoDI
5505.18; DoDI 6495.02; DoDI 6495.03,
DoDD 1350.2, DoDD 6495.01, DoDD
5205.16 and DoDD 7050.06. Also, it pre-
scribes the policy and responsibility of
command, which include the Army Ready
and Resilient Campaign Plan, military
discipline and conduct, the Army Equal
Opportunity Program, and the Army Sex-
ual Harassment/Assault Response and
Prevention Program. The 30-day ad-
vanced publication requirement has been
waived because the revision implements
previously published law, DoD directives
and instructions, and Army directives that
need to be consolidated and communi-
cated to the field as soon as possible.

Applicability. This regulation applies
to the Regular Army, the Army National
Guard/Army National Guard of the
United States, and the U.S. Army Re-
serve, unless otherwise stated. It also ap-
plies to all assigned, attached, or opera-
tionally controlled U.S. Army Corrections
Command personnel, and all Army Cor-
rections System prisoners incarcerated in
Army Corrections System facilities.

Chapters 6 and 7 and appendix E apply to
members of the Army National Guard of
the United States when on active duty Ti-
tle 10 orders, for 30 days or more. In all
other cases, members of the Army Na-
tional Guard are governed by regulations
issued by the Chief, National Guard Bu-
reau consistent with Chief, National
Guard Bureau’s authorities under 32 USC
110, 10 USC 10503, and DoDD 5105.77.
It also applies where stated to Department
of the Army Civilians. Portions of this
regulation that prescribe specific conduct
are punitive, and violations of these pro-
visions may subject offenders to nonjudi-
cial or judicial action under the Uniform
Code of Military Justice. The equal op-
portunity terms found in the glossary are
applicable only to uniformed personnel.
AR 690 – 600 and AR 690 – 12 contains
similar terms that are applicable to De-
partment of the Army Civilians.

Proponent and exception authority.
The proponent of this regulation is the
Deputy Chief of Staff, G – 1. The propo-
nent has the authority to approve excep-
tions or waivers to this regulation that are
consistent with controlling law and regu-
lations. The proponent may delegate this
approval authority, in writing, to a divi-
sion chief within the proponent agency or
its direct reporting unit or field operating
agency in the grade of colonel or the civil-
ian equivalent may request a waiver to
this regulation by providing justification
that includes a full analysis of the ex-
pected benefits and must include formal
review by the activity’s senior legal of-
ficer. All waiver requests will be endorsed
by the commander or senior leader of the
requesting activity and forwarded through
their higher headquarters to the policy
proponent. Refer to AR 25 – 30 for specific
guidance.

Army internal control process.
This regulation contains internal control
provisions in accordance with AR 11 – 2

and identifies key internal controls that
must be evaluated (app R).
Supplementation. Supplementation
of this regulation and establishment of
command and local forms are prohibited
without prior approval from the Deputy
Chief of Staff, G – 1 (DAPE – MP), 300
Army Pentagon, Washington, DC
20310 – 0300.

Suggested improvements. Users
are invited to send comments and sug-
gested improvements on DA Form 2028
(Recommended Changes to Publications
and Blank Forms) directly to Deputy
Chief of Staff, G – 1 (DAPE – MP), 300
Army Pentagon, Washington, DC
20310 – 0300.

Committee management. AR 15 – 39
requires the proponent to justify establish-
ing/continuing committee(s), coordinate
draft publications, and coordinate changes
in committee status with the Office of the
Administrative Assistant to the Secretary
of the Army, Department of the Army
Committee Management Office
(AARP – ZA), 105 Army Pentagon, Wash-
ington DC, 20310 – 0105. Further, if it is
determined that an established “group”
identified within this regulation later takes
on the characteristics of a committee as
found in AR 15 – 39, then the proponent
will follow AR 15 – 39 requirements for
establishing and continuing the group as a
committee.

Distribution. This regulation is availa-
ble in electronic media only and is in-
tended for the Regular Army, the Army
National Guard/Army National Guard of
the United States, and the U.S. Army Re-
serve.

AR 600–20 • 24 July 2020 i

Contents (Listed by paragraph and page number)

Chapter 1
Introduction, page 1
Purpose • 1 – 1, page 1
References and forms • 1 – 2, page 1
Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1 – 3, page 1
Responsibilities • 1 – 4, page 1
Records management (recordkeeping) requirements • 1 – 5, page 2
Command • 1 – 6, page 2
Military grade and rank • 1 – 7, page 3
Precedence between Soldiers and other Service Members serving with the Army • 1 – 8, page 7
Precedence between members of the Army and members of foreign military services serving with the

Army • 1 – 9, page 8

Chapter 2
Command Policies, page 8
Chain of command • 2 – 1, page 8
Open door policies • 2 – 2, page 8
Performance counseling • 2 – 3, page 8
Staff or technical channels • 2 – 4, page 9
Command of installations, activities, and units • 2 – 5, page 9
Command of installations, activities, and units of Joint bases • 2 – 6, page 16
Specialty immaterial commands • 2 – 7, page 20
Designation of junior in the same grade to command • 2 – 8, page 20
Death, disability, retirement, reassignment, or absence of the commander • 2 – 9, page 21
Absence or disability of all officers of a unit • 2 – 10, page 21
Emergency command • 2 – 11, page 22
Functions of an individual in temporary command • 2 – 12, page 22
Responsibility of successor • 2 – 13, page 22
Separate commands of the Army serving together • 2 – 14, page 22
Separate commands of the several military services of the United States serving together • 2 – 15, page 22
Ineligibility for command of post or activity • 2 – 16, page 22
Restrictions • 2 – 17, page 23
Relief for cause • 2 – 18, page 23
Noncommissioned officer support channel • 2 – 19, page 24

Chapter 3
Ready and Resilient, page 25
General • 3 – 1, page 25
The Army Ready and Resilient strategic governance process • 3 – 2, page 25
Responsibilities • 3 – 3, page 26

Chapter 4
Military Discipline and Conduct, page 27
Military discipline • 4 – 1, page 27
Obedience to orders • 4 – 2, page 27
Military courtesy • 4 – 3, page 27
Soldier conduct • 4 – 4, page 27
Maintenance of order • 4 – 5, page 28
Exercising military authority • 4 – 6, page 28
Disciplinary powers of the commanding officer • 4 – 7, page 28
Settlement of local accounts on change of station • 4 – 8, page 29
Civil status of members of the U.S. Army Reserve • 4 – 9, page 29

Contents—Continued

AR 600–20 • 24 July 2020 ii

Participation in support of civilian law-enforcement agencies • 4 – 10, page 30
Membership campaigns • 4 – 11, page 30
Extremist organizations and activities • 4 – 12, page 30
Army language policy • 4 – 13, page 34
Relationships between Soldiers of different grades • 4 – 14, page 34
Other prohibited relationships • 4 – 15, page 35
Fraternization • 4 – 16, page 38
Standards of conduct • 4 – 17, page 38
Employment and volunteer work of spouse • 4 – 18, page 38
The Army Harassment Prevention and Response Program (hazing, bullying, and discriminatory harass-

ment) • 4 – 19, page 39
Informal funds • 4 – 20, page 42
Misuse of government travel charge cards • 4 – 21, page 42
Domestic Violence Amendment to the Gun Control Act of 1968 • 4 – 22, page 43
Self-reporting of criminal convictions by officers and senior enlisted members • 4 – 23, page 46
Command responsibility under the law of war • 4 – 24, page 47
Personnel recovery and code of conduct training • 4 – 25, page 47
Combating trafficking in persons • 4 – 26, page 47

Chapter 5
Other Responsibilities of Command, page 48
General • 5 – 1, page 48
Army Family readiness • 5 – 2, page 48
Family care plans • 5 – 3, page 49
Command aspects of medical readiness and medical care • 5 – 4, page 54
Breastfeeding and lactation support policy • 5 – 5, page 57
Accommodating religious practices • 5 – 6, page 57
Unit memorial ceremonies and services policy • 5 – 7, page 60
Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers • 5 – 8, page 62
Soldier for Life – Transition Assistance Program • 5 – 9, page 62
Federal Parent Locator Service • 5 – 10, page 63
Complaints or accusations against military personnel • 5 – 11, page 63
Military Whistleblower Protection Act • 5 – 12, page 64
Retaliation • 5 – 13, page 65
Appearance before congressional committees • 5 – 14, page 66
Political activities • 5 – 15, page 66
Prohibition of military labor unions • 5 – 16, page 67
On-post distribution of non-government printed materials • 5 – 17, page 69
Insider Threat Program • 5 – 18, page 70
Risk management • 5 – 19, page 71
Operations security • 5 – 20, page 71
Adoption Reimbursement Program • 5 – 21, page 71

Chapter 6
Military Equal Opportunity Policy and Program, page 72
Purpose • 6 – 1, page 72
Military equal opportunity policies • 6 – 2, page 72
Military equal opportunity professional staffing • 6 – 3, page 73
Military equal opportunity training and education • 6 – 4, page 73
Command climate assessment • 6 – 5, page 73
Military Equal Opportunity and Harassment Complaint Processing System • 6 – 6, page 73
Retaliation Prevention and Response • 6 – 7, page 83
Military equal opportunity definitions • 6 –8, page 83
Racial and ethnic categories • 6 – 9, page 83
Military Equal Opportunity Program and Harassment Prevention and Response Program responsibilities • 6 –

10, page 83

Contents—Continued

AR 600–20 • 24 July 2020 iii

Chapter 7
Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program, page 87
Scope • 7 – 1, page 87
Policy • 7 – 2, page 88
Purpose • 7 – 3, page 88
Program eligibility • 7 – 4, page 88
Responsibilities • 7 – 5, page 88
Program fundamentals • 7 – 6, page 103
Sexual harassment • 7 – 7, page 104
Sexual Harassment Complaint Processing System • 7 – 8, page 105
Sexual assault • 7 – 9, page 112
Retaliation in response to reports of sexual assault and sexual harassment • 7 – 10, page 113
Commander actions upon notification of a sexual assault • 7 –11, page 113

Appendixes
A. References, page 117
B. Political Activities, page 130
C. Military Equal Opportunity Professional Staffing, page 132
D. Military Equal Opportunity and Harassment Training and Education, page 137
E. Command Climate Assessment, page 139
F. Sexual Assault Review Board for Unrestricted Reports of Sexual Assault, page 146
G. Department of Defense Sexual Assault Advocate Certification Program Requirements, Training, and Additional

Skill Identifier Assignment, page 151

H. Retaliation Prevention and Response, page 156
I. Expedited Transfer Victim Requests, page 160
J. Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Commander’s Critical Information Require-

ment(s), page 162

K. Sexual Assault Incident Response Oversight Report, page 164
L. Confidentiality Guidelines for Restricted/Unrestricted Reporting, page 167
M. 24/7 Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Hotline, page 173
N. Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program Organization Inspection Program, page 176
O. Inspector General Activities in Support of the Commander, page 178
P. Religious Accommodation, page 185
Q. Racial and Ethnic Designation Categories, page 192
R. Internal Control Evaluation, page 195

Table List

Table 1 – 1: Grades, Army, page 3
Table 1 – 2: Comparable grades among the Services, page 7
Table E – 1: Command Climate Assessment guidance, page 140
Table G – 1: Qualifications, page 151
Table I – 1: Victim transfer processes, page 161
Table K – 1: Sexual Assault Incident Response Oversight report reporting responsibilities, page 165
Table P – 1: Process for General Court-Martial Convening Authority uniform and grooming requests and all waiver

requests, page 190
Table Q – 1: Reporting codes–race/population group, page 192

Contents—Continued

AR 600–20 • 24 July 2020 iv

Table Q – 2: Reporting codes–ethnic group, page 192
Table Q – 3: Racial/ethnic designation categories, page 194

Figure List

Figure 2 – 1: Command and support relationships at U.S. Army Materiel Command-managed installations, page 12
Figure 2 – 2: Assumption of command, page 14
Figure 2 – 3: Appointment of commander, page 15
Figure 2 – 4: Command relationships at Joint bases, page 18
Figure 2 – 5: Joint Base Management Oversight Structure, page 20
Figure O – 1: Right of Soldiers to present complaints to the inspector general, page 182
Figure O – 1: Right of Soldiers to present complaints to the inspector general—Continued, page 182
Figure O – 2: Right of Department of the Army Civilian employees to present complaints to the inspector gen-

eral, page 184
Figure O – 2: Right of Department of the Army Civilian employees to present complaints to the inspector general—

Continued, page 184

Glossary

AR 600–20 • 24 July 2020 1

Chapter 1
Introduction

1 – 1. Purpose
This regulation prescribes the policies and responsibilities of command, which include the Army Ready and Resilient
Campaign Plan, military discipline and conduct, the Army Military Equal Opportunity (MEO) Program, the Army
Harassment Prevention and Response Program, and the Army Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention
(SHARP) Program.

1 – 2. References and forms
See appendix A.

1 – 3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms
See the glossary.

1 – 4. Responsibilities
Detailed responsibilities are listed and described in separate chapters under specific programs and command functions.
This paragraph outlines general or overarching responsibilities.

a. The Principal Officials of Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) direct policies, programs, and re-
sources in support of command responsibilities.

b. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations, Energy and Environment) (ASA (IE&E)) is responsible for
setting the strategic direction for and ensuring that Army policies and programs related to installations, including
Army real estate, joint basing, military construction, energy and water security and sustainability, and the environment,
safety, and occupational health are executed consistent with law, regulation, and policy. In addition, the ASA (IE&E)
is responsible for oversight of the execution functions performed by the Corps of Engineers related to the Army’s
military construction, real property, real estate, energy, and environmental safety and occupational health programs.

c. The Assistant Secretary for the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (ASA (M&RA)) is responsible for setting
the strategic direction for and ensuring Army policies, plans, and programs for personnel, force structure, manpower
management, total force management, total force policy, training, military and personnel readiness, Reserve affairs,
and Army protection are executed consistent with law, regulation, and policy. In addition, the ASA (M&RA) is spe-
cifically responsible for the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and MEO Programs and morale, welfare, recrea-
tion (MWR) and Family support programs.

d. The Vice Chief of Staff, Army (VCSA) tasks the Army Staff (ARSTAF) as necessary to coordinate the readiness
and resiliency of the force.

e. The Deputy Chief of Staff, G – 1 (DCS, G – 1) has ARSTAF responsibility for developing and executing Army
strategy, policy, plans, and programs that relate to—

(1) Chain of command (see para 2 – 1), designation of junior in the same grade to command (see para 2 – 8), and
assumption of command by the senior regularly assigned Soldiers when the commander dies, is disabled, resigns,
retires, or is absent (see para 2 – 9).

(2) The Army Ready and Resilient Plan (see chap 3).
(3) Extremist organizations and activities (see para 4 – 12), relationships between Soldiers of different grade (see

para 4 – 14), and other prohibited relationships (see para 4 – 15).
(4) Political activities (see para 5 – 16), Family care plans (see para 5 – 3), and accommodation of religious practices

(see para 5 – 6).
(5) The Army SHARP Program (see para 7 – 4).
f. The Deputy Chief of Staff, G – 9 (DCS, G – 9) has ARSTAF responsibility for planning, developing, implement-

ing, resourcing, overseeing, and evaluating the execution of strategies, policies, plans, and programs for the delivery
of installation services and infrastructure to support readiness. The DCS, G – 9 will—

(1) Advise the ASA (IE&E) on planning, developing policy, resourcing, implementing, and evaluating—
(a) Comprehensive installation management operations, facilities’ investment, environmental programs, excess in-

stallation property, real property management, master planning, joint basing, and energy and water security and sus-
tainability.

(b) Army housing, nontactical vehicles, public and private partnerships, installation safety, and installation logis-
tics.

AR 600–20 • 24 July 2020 2

(2) Advise the ASA (M&RA) on planning, developing policy, resourcing, implementing, and evaluating MWR
programs, nonappropriated fund instrumentalities, and Soldier and Family readiness programs.

g. The Commanding General, Army Materiel Command (AMC) is responsible for the execution and delivery of
Soldier, Civilian, and Family programs and services at the installation in support of total force Readiness …

DOD INSTRUCTION 1020.03

HARASSMENT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE IN THE ARMED
FORCES

Originating Component: Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness

Effective: February 8, 2018

Releasability: Cleared for public release. Available on the Directives Division Website

at http://www.esd.whs.mil/DD/.

Incorporates and Cancels: Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Policy

Memorandum, “Prevention and Response to Sexual Harassment,”
September 19, 2014

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, “Prohibition of Sexual Harassment in
the Department of Defense (DoD),” August 22, 1994

Approved by: Robert L. Wilkie, Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness

Purpose: In accordance with the authority in DoD Directive (DoDD) 5124.02, this issuance:

• Establishes a comprehensive, DoD-wide military harassment prevention and response program.

• Updates military harassment prevention and response policies and programs for Service members.

• Updates harassment prevention and response procedures for Service members to submit harassment
complaints, including anonymous complaints; procedures and requirements for responding to,
processing, resolving, tracking, and reporting harassment complaints; and training and education
requirements and standards.

• Supplements the DoD Retaliation Prevention and Response Strategy (RPRS) Implementation Plan
for sexual harassment complaints involving retaliation.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

TABLE OF CONTENTS 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION 1: GENERAL ISSUANCE INFORMATION …………………………………………………………………… 3

1.1. Applicability. …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
1.2. Policy. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
1.3. Information Collections. ……………………………………………………………………………………… 3

SECTION 2: RESPONSIBILITIES …………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
2.1. Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (USD(P&R)). …………………… 4
2.2. Director, Force Resiliency. ………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
2.3. Director, Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity (ODMEO). ………….. 4
2.4. Secretaries of the Military Departments. ……………………………………………………………….. 5
2.5. DoD Component Heads other than the Secretaries of the Military Departments. ………… 7
2.6. Chief, National Guard Bureau. …………………………………………………………………………….. 8

SECTION 3: TYPES OF HARASSMENT COVERED BY THIS ISSUANCE …………………………………………. 9
3.1. Harassment. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
3.2. Discriminatory Harassment. ………………………………………………………………………………… 9
3.3. Sexual Harassment. …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
3.4. Bullying…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10
3.5. Hazing. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11
3.6. Retaliation. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 12
3.7. Reprisal. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

SECTION 4: PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PROCESSING HARASSMENT COMPLAINTS FROM
SERVICE MEMBERS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

4.1. Informal Complaints. ………………………………………………………………………………………… 13
4.2. Formal Harassment Complaints Not Involving Sexual Harassment or Sexual Assault

Allegations. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13
4.3. Harassment Complaints Involving Sexual Assault Allegations. ……………………………… 13
4.4. Sexual Harassment Complaints Not Involving Sexual Assault Allegations. …………….. 14
4.5. Harassment Complaints in Joint Service Environments. ………………………………………… 14
4.6. Anonymous Complaints. ……………………………………………………………………………………. 15
4.7. Supplemental Guidance. ……………………………………………………………………………………. 15
4.8. Release of Reports. …………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

SECTION 5: RESPONDING TO HARASSMENT COMPLAINTS FROM SERVICE MEMBERS ……………….. 17
5.1. Responding to Harassment Complaints. ………………………………………………………………. 17
5.2. Appealing Administrative Findings of Harassment Complaints. …………………………….. 17

SECTION 6: PREVENTION AND RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION …………………………………… 18
6.1. Prevention and Response Training and Education Programs. …………………………………. 18
6.2. Requirements for Prevention and Response Training and Education Programs. ……….. 18

SECTION 7: DATA COLLECTION AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS ………………………………………… 19
7.1. Data Collection. ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19
7.2. Reporting Requirements. …………………………………………………………………………………… 20

GLOSSARY ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21
G.1. Acronyms. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21
G.2. Definitions. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21

REFERENCES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 23

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 1: GENERAL ISSUANCE INFORMATION 3

SECTION 1: GENERAL ISSUANCE INFORMATION

1.1. APPLICABILITY. This issuance:

a. Applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the
Department of Defense, the Defense Agencies, the DoD Field Activities, and all other
organizational entities within the DoD (referred to collectively in this issuance as the “DoD
Components”).

b. Does not apply to DoD civilian employees, who should be referred to the appropriate
servicing equal opportunity office in accordance with DoDD 1440.1; Volume 771 of DoD
Instruction (DoDI) 1400.25; and Section 1561 of Title 10, United States Code (U.S.C.).

1.2. POLICY.

a. The Department does not tolerate or condone harassment. Harassment jeopardizes
combat readiness and mission accomplishment, weakens trust within the ranks, and erodes unit
cohesion. Harassment is fundamentally at odds with the obligations of Service members to treat
others with dignity and respect.

b. DoD will hold leaders at all levels appropriately accountable for fostering a climate of
inclusion that supports diversity, is free from harassment, and does not tolerate retaliation against
those filing harassment complaints.

c. Military Departments will incorporate the definitions in the Glossary of this issuance into
their respective harassment prevention and response implementing regulations and may
supplement the definitions, as necessary.

d. Violations of the policies in this instruction may constitute violations of specific articles
of Chapter 47 of Title 10, U.S.C., also known and referred to in this issuance as the “Uniform
Code of Military Justice (UCMJ)” and may result in administrative or disciplinary action.

1.3. INFORMATION COLLECTIONS.

a. Reports referred to in Paragraphs 2.1.b, 2.3.e, 2.3.f, 2.4.c, 4.2.d, 4.4.d, 4.4.e, 4.5.d, 4.8,
7.1., and 7.2. do not require licensing with a report control symbol in accordance with
Paragraphs 1 and 8 of Volume 1 of DoD Manual (DoDM) 8910.01.

b. The Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) Organizational Climate
Survey has been assigned report control symbol DD-P&R(AR)2338 in accordance with the
procedures in Volume 1 of DoDM 8910.01. The expiration date of this information collection is
listed in the DoD Information Collections System at
https://eitsdext.osd.mil/sites/dodiic/Pages/default.aspx.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 2: RESPONSIBILITIES 4

SECTION 2: RESPONSIBILITIES

2.1. UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR PERSONNEL AND READINESS
(USD(P&R)). The USD(P&R):

a. Establishes and oversees DoD-wide policies and programs for military harassment
prevention and response.

b. Establishes standardized DoD Component data reporting requirements for harassment
complaints and information collection and tracking, including approval of automated data
collection interface systems.

2.2. DIRECTOR, FORCE RESILIENCY. Under the authority, direction, and control of the
USD(P&R), the Director, Force Resiliency:

a. Oversees DoD Component implementation and compliance with this instruction.

b. Oversees and develops harassment prevention and response program strategies and plans.

c. Provides to the USD(P&R) an assessment of programmatic effectiveness, and compliance
with strategies and plans with recommendations for improvements on an annual basis.

d. Monitors and directs strategic planning based on annual data analysis and assessment
provided across Force Resiliency portfolios.

e. Oversees the collection of data and information related to harassment complaints.

f. Reviews and refers to the appropriate Military Department harassment complaints sent to
the Secretary of Defense or the USD(P&R).

2.3. DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT AND EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY (ODMEO). Under the authority, direction, and control of the USD(P&R),
through the Director, Force Resiliency, the Director, ODMEO:

a. Serves as the DoD principal responsible for developing DoD harassment prevention and
response policy.

b. Directs and manages implementation of the DoD harassment prevention and response
program.

c. Conducts compliance reviews of DoD Component harassment prevention and response
policies and programs in accordance with this instruction, including:

(1) Assessments of impartiality, timeliness, and sufficiency of harassment complaints.

(2) Timeliness and sufficiency of feedback provided to complainants.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 2: RESPONSIBILITIES 5

(3) Effectiveness of policies and programs in reducing incidents of harassment and
providing appropriate victim services, care, and support.

d. Ensures that DoD Component harassment prevention and response programs incorporate,
at minimum:

(1) Long-term goals, objectives, and milestones;

(2) Results-oriented performance measures to assess effectiveness; and

(3) Compliance standards for promoting, supporting, and enforcing policies, plans, and
programs.

e. Collects, assesses, and analyzes information and data regarding harassment complaints
received by the Military Departments and compiles reports in accordance with reporting
requirements outlined in Paragraph 7.2.

f. Makes recommendations to the USD(P&R) through the Director, Force Resiliency, after
receiving annual reports from the Military Departments, to establish, update, and maintain
harassment prevention and response policies and programs.

g. Directs the Commandant, DEOMI, to:

(1) Establish standards, core competencies, and learning objectives for DoD Component
harassment prevention and response training and education programs.

(2) Tailor training materials to Service member professional development levels and
associated leadership duties and responsibilities.

(3) Ensure training materials and curriculum include, at minimum, prevention strategies
and risk and protective factors.

(4) Review Military Department training plans for compliance with this instruction and
sufficiency of content, and report potential deficiencies to the Director, ODMEO.

2.4. SECRETARIES OF THE MILITARY DEPARTMENTS. The Secretaries of the
Military Departments:

a. Establish military harassment prevention and response programs that ensure:

(1) Service members are treated with dignity and respect.

(2) Leaders at all levels are held appropriately accountable for fostering a climate of
inclusion within their organizations that supports diversity, is free from harassment, and does not
tolerate retaliation for reporting harassment allegations.

(3) Harassment complaints are investigated in an impartial and timely manner.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 2: RESPONSIBILITIES 6

(4) Complainants receive access to available victim services and support, and will be
afforded an opportunity to provide input regarding disposition.

(5) Complainants receive ongoing timely information regarding the status of their
complaints and notice of disposition.

b. Oversee Military Department programs, which will include:

(1) Information regarding how to identify harassment, DoD standard definitions, and
types of harassment, as outlined in Section 3.

(2) Information regarding how to identify sexual assault under Article 120 of the UCMJ
and reporting procedures.

(3) Information regarding reporting options, procedures, and applicable timelines to
submit harassment complaints, including anonymous complaints and complaints involving a
Service member’s commander or supervisor, to the appropriate commander or supervisor, the
inspector general’s office, military equal opportunity (MEO) office, or staff designated by the
Military Service to receive harassment complaints.

(4) Procedures for commanders and supervisors to receive, respond to, investigate, and
resolve harassment complaints, including those made in Joint Service environments consistent
with Paragraph 4.5.

(5) Training and education requirements for commanders, supervisors, Service members,
and any other appropriate personnel (e.g., chaplains, judge advocates, investigating officers,
inspectors general, MEO personnel, and staff designated by the Service to receive complaints).
In addition to requirements in Section 6, training will include at minimum training modules and
materials provided by DEOMI. Service developed training plans for such personnel will be
submitted to DEOMI for review before implementation.

(6) Mechanisms to collect, track, assess, and analyze data and information related to
harassment complaints in accordance with Section 7.

(7) Mechanisms to maintain data regarding harassment complaints in a manner that will
ensure adequate tracking of complaints from Service members assigned, detailed, or otherwise
working in a DoD Component, other than a Military Department, consistent with Service-
specific record retention policies and procedures and DoDI 5015.02.

(8) Requirements to prominently post and publicize information regarding Military
Department harassment prevention and response policies and programs, including information
stated in Paragraphs 2.4.b.(1).

c. Respond to ODMEO data calls in accordance with Section 7, including data and reports to
support annual Congressional and DoD fiscal year reports. Data and reports will be submitted as
follows:

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 2: RESPONSIBILITIES 7

(1) Hazing and bullying data by December 1, in accordance with the December 23, 2015,
Deputy Secretary of Defense Memorandum.

(2) Data and reports on all other types of harassment, including sexual harassment, by
January 31.

d. Ensure that a minimum of one 24-hour toll-free or local hotline (or advice line) provides
information on harassment policies and procedures covered within this issuance, including how
and where to file complaints, the behaviors that constitute harassment, and information about the
DoD-wide hotline for Sexual Assault at https://www.SafeHelpline.org.

e. Ensure appropriate administrative or disciplinary action is taken against Service members
in cases involving substantiated harassment complaints.

f. Mandate that substantiated complaints are annotated on fitness reports or performance
evaluations.

g. Verify that commanders conduct climate assessments and take appropriate action as
required.

h. Assist and support harassment complainants in accordance with DoDD 1350.2, DoDI
1030.2, and DoDI 6400.07. Complainants should be provided adequate protection and care, and
informed about available support resources, including:

(1) Military and civilian emergency medical and support services.

(2) Public and private programs that are available to provide counseling, treatment, and
other support.

(3) Organizations and entities on- and off-base that provide victim and witness services
and support.

2.5. DOD COMPONENT HEADS OTHER THAN THE SECRETARIES OF THE
MILITARY DEPARTMENTS. The DoD Component heads other than the Secretaries of the
Military Departments will:

a. Ensure Service members are treated with dignity and respect.

b. Leaders at all levels are held appropriately accountable for fostering a climate of inclusion
within their organizations that supports diversity, is free from harassment, and does not tolerate
retaliation for reporting harassment allegations.

c. Refer harassment complaints from Service members assigned, detailed, or otherwise
working in a DoD Component other than a Military Department to the Service member’s
Military Department and provide them information regarding reporting options.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 2: RESPONSIBILITIES 8

d. Prominently post and publicize information regarding Military Department harassment
prevention and response policies and programs, including information stated in Paragraph
2.4.b.(1).

e. Mandate that substantiated complaints are annotated on fitness reports or performance
evaluations.

f. Support investigations by providing access to information, as appropriate, to ensure that
investigations are impartial and timely.

g. Ensure training and education requirements are consistent with those outlined in
Section 6.

h. Assist and support harassment complainants in accordance with DoDD 1350.2, DoDI
1030.2, and DoDI 6400.07. Complainants should be provided adequate protection and care, and
informed about available support resources, including:

(1) Military and civilian emergency medical and support services.

(2) Public and private programs that are available to provide counseling, treatment, and
other support.

(3) Organizations and entities on- and off-base that provide victim and witness services
and support.

2.6. CHIEF, NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU. The Chief, National Guard Bureau, will
implement the policies and procedures outlined in this instruction, consistent with DoDD 1350.2.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 3: TYPES OF HARASSMENT COVERED BY THIS ISSUANCE 9

SECTION 3: TYPES OF HARASSMENT COVERED BY THIS ISSUANCE

3.1. HARASSMENT. Behavior that is unwelcome or offensive to a reasonable person, whether
oral, written, or physical, that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.
Harassment can occur through electronic communications, including social media, other forms
of communication, and in person. Harassment may include offensive jokes, epithets, ridicule or
mockery, insults or put-downs, displays of offensive objects or imagery, stereotyping,
intimidating acts, veiled threats of violence, threatening or provoking remarks, racial or other
slurs, derogatory remarks about a person’s accent, or displays of racially offensive symbols.
Activities or actions undertaken for a proper military or governmental purpose, such as combat
survival training, are not considered harassment.

3.2. DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT. A form of harassment that is unwelcome conduct
based on race, color, religion, sex (including gender identity), national origin, or sexual
orientation.

3.3. SEXUAL HARASSMENT.

a. Sexual harassment is:

(1) Conduct that:

(a) Involves unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and deliberate
or repeated offensive comments or gestures of a sexual nature when:

1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or
condition of a person’s job, pay, or career;

2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by a person is used as a basis for
career or employment decisions affecting that person; or

3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
individual’s work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment; and

(b) Is so severe or pervasive that a reasonable person would perceive, and the victim
does perceive, the environment as hostile or offensive.

(2) Any use or condonation, by any person in a supervisory or command position, of any
form of sexual behavior to control, influence, or affect the career, pay, or job of a member of the
Armed Forces.

(3) Any deliberate or repeated unwelcome verbal comments or gestures of a sexual
nature by any member of the Armed Forces or civilian employee of the Department of Defense.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 3: TYPES OF HARASSMENT COVERED BY THIS ISSUANCE 10

b. There is no requirement for concrete psychological harm to the complainant for behavior
to constitute sexual harassment. Behavior is sufficient to constitute sexual harassment if it is so
severe or pervasive that a reasonable person would perceive, and the complainant does perceive,
the environment as hostile or offensive.

c. Sexual harassment can occur through electronic communications, including social media,
other forms of communication, and in person.

3.4. BULLYING. A form of harassment that includes acts of aggression by Service members
or DoD civilian employees, with a nexus to military service, with the intent of harming a Service
member either physically or psychologically, without a proper military or other governmental
purpose. Bullying may involve the singling out of an individual from his or her coworkers, or
unit, for ridicule because he or she is considered different or weak. It often involves an
imbalance of power between the aggressor and the victim. Bullying can be conducted through
the use of electronic devices or communications, and by other means including social media, as
well as in person.

a. Bullying is evaluated by a reasonable person standard and includes, but is not limited to
the following when performed without a proper military or other governmental purpose:

(1) Physically striking another person in any manner or threatening to do the same;

(2) Intimidating, teasing, or taunting another person;

(3) Oral or written berating of another person with the purpose of belittling or
humiliating;

(4) Encouraging another person to engage in illegal, harmful, demeaning or dangerous
acts;

(5) Playing abusive or malicious tricks;

(6) Branding, handcuffing, duct taping, tattooing, shaving, greasing, or painting another
person;

(7) Subjecting another person to excessive or abusive use of water;

(8) Forcing another person to consume food, alcohol, drugs, or any other substance;

(9) Degrading or damaging another’s property or reputation; and

(10) Soliciting, coercing, or knowingly permitting another person to solicit or coerce acts
of bullying.

b. Bullying does not include properly directed command or organizational activities that
serve a proper military or other governmental purpose, or the requisite training activities required
to prepare for such activities (e.g., command-authorized physical training).

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 3: TYPES OF HARASSMENT COVERED BY THIS ISSUANCE 11

c. Service members may be responsible for an act of bullying even if there was actual or
implied consent from the victim and regardless of the grade or rank, status, or Service of the
victim.

d. Bullying is prohibited in all circumstances and environments, including off-duty or
“unofficial” unit functions and settings.

3.5. HAZING. A form of harassment that includes conduct through which Service members or
DoD employees, without a proper military or other governmental purpose but with a nexus to
military Service, physically or psychologically injures or creates a risk of physical or
psychological injury to Service members for the purpose of: initiation into, admission into,
affiliation with, change in status or position within, or a condition for continued membership in
any military or DoD civilian organization. Hazing can be conducted through the use of
electronic devices or communications, and by other means including social media, as well as in
person.

a. Hazing is evaluated by a reasonable person standard and includes, but is not limited to, the
following when performed without a proper military or other governmental purpose:

(1) Any form of initiation or congratulatory act that involves physically striking another
person in any manner or threatening to do the same;

(2) Pressing any object into another person’s skin, regardless of whether it pierces the
skin, such as “pinning” or “tacking on” of rank insignia, aviator wings, jump wings, diver
insignia, badges, medals, or any other object;

(3) Oral or written berating of another person with the purpose of belittling or
humiliating;

(4) Encouraging another person to engage in illegal, harmful, demeaning or dangerous
acts;

(5) Playing abusive or malicious tricks;

(6) Branding, handcuffing, duct taping, tattooing, shaving, greasing, or painting another
person;

(7) Subjecting another person to excessive or abusive use of water:

(8) Forcing another person to consume food, alcohol, drugs, or any other substance; and

(9) Soliciting, coercing, or knowingly permitting another person to solicit or coerce acts
of hazing.

b. Hazing does not include properly directed command or organizational activities that serve
a proper military or other governmental purpose, or the requisite training activities required to

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 3: TYPES OF HARASSMENT COVERED BY THIS ISSUANCE 12

prepare for such activities (e.g., administrative corrective measures, extra military instruction, or
command-authorized physical training).

c. Service members may be responsible for an act of hazing even if there was actual or
implied consent from the victim and regardless of the grade or rank, status, or Service of the
victim.

d. Hazing is prohibited in all circumstances and environments including off-duty or
“unofficial” unit functions and settings.

3.6. RETALIATION. Retaliation encompasses illegal, impermissible, or hostile actions taken
by a Service member’s chain of command, peers, or coworkers as a result of making or being
suspected of making a protected communication in accordance with DoDD 7050.06. Retaliation
for reporting a criminal offense can occur in several ways, including reprisal. Investigation of
complaints of non-criminal retaliatory actions other than reprisal will be processed consistent
with Service-specific regulations. In addition to reprisal, defined in Paragraph 3.7, additional
retaliatory behaviors include ostracism, maltreatment, and criminal acts for a retaliatory purpose
in connection with an alleged sex-related offense or sexual harassment; or for performance of
duties concerning an alleged sex-related offense or sexual harassment. For detailed definitions
of the full range of retaliatory behaviors, see the RPRS Implementation Plan.

3.7. REPRISAL. In accordance with Section 1034 of Title 10, U.S.C., as implemented by
DoDD 7050.06, reprisal is defined as taking or threatening to take an unfavorable personnel
action, or withholding or threatening to withhold a favorable personnel action, for making,
preparing to make, or being perceived as making or preparing to make a protected
communication.

DoDI 1020.03, February 8, 2018

SECTION 4: PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PROCESSING HARASSMENT COMPLAINTS
FROM SERVICE MEMBERS 13

SECTION 4: PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PROCESSING
HARASSMENT COMPLAINTS FROM SERVICE MEMBERS

4.1. INFORMAL COMPLAINTS. Informal complaints, as defined in this instruction, should
be addressed at the lowest possible level. …

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